private pilot ground school Articles | Index    

Opinion On Trim
2010-03-18

Opinion On Trim Trimming the airplane is something that comes with practice. Like many others have said here, the best way to learn is to get the airplane relatively stabilized where you want it (climb, cruise, or decent) and trim the forces off. The best way to get it right on is when you think you've got it close, simply let go of the yoke. If the nose comes up or goes down, feed in a little more trim in the right direction. You should eventually be able to trim the airplane to be rock steady in any flight condition (smooth air assumed:)). In fact, you know the trim wheel on the 172 has little bumps on it just for grip? You should get to the point where moving the trim wheel one bump in either direction makes a noticeable difference to the trim.

I tend to be very active with the trim. In fact, I usually retrim for nearly everything I'm doing if I'm going to be doing it for more than a couple of minutes. For example, on climbout, I trim for the climb airspeed and let the airplane fly the climb. In cruise, I do the same. Also on approach, I retrim for each configuration to give me the decent rate I'm looking for. In this way, I'm only ever maneuvering the airplane away from the trimmed condition. In other words, on approach, I don't have to "fly" the airplane for the approach because the trim is taking that workload. That allows me to concentrate on making the correct turns, setting up the approach, watching out for traffic, configuring the airplane, watching my decent rate, all without having to manhandle the yoke. If I need more or less decent rate, I just move the trim a hair.

The trim on the Piper Cub is a great little arrangement that uses a winding handle like a car window. It takes quite a
few turns to trim from a climb to level flight, etc. but it also allows you to make really fine adjustments. In fact, when in the glide for approach, I may make adjustments to the trim that are all of about 1/8th of a turn or even less.
Shawn

Trim Opinion
My instructor recommended the following and it works for me;-)
--First NEVER fly the plane with trim wheel, always establish your attitude (level, climb or descend) with Yoke and power
first.
--When you're stable trim off heavy yoke pressure first and resettle
--Then fine trim until you just have your hand on the yoke but you aren't inputting any effort at all.
--Let go for a second or two and check and check that it doesn't climb or descend is the final proof.
--Retrim for every change in attitude. I got to practice this in the circuit under the lashing tongue of my instructor... Trim
for climb out before and after raising the flaps, trim on crosswind after leveling, trim after every flap setting and throttle setting on downwind, base and final. You really get the hang of it then I can tell you!

Gene's addendum:
Should you ever be in a situation where the elevator is jammed and will not move, you should be aware that this causes the movement of the trim to give reverse effects in so far as directing the nose up or down.

Trim Opinion
Trimming takes some practice but once mastered will make every aspect of your flying easier. First thing is you can't trim the plane until it is where you want it to be. If it's climbing you can't just throw in nose down trim, that would be trying to fly the plane with trim and even though that's not that uncommon, it won't work. You have to hold the plane in whatever attitude you are trying to hold, let the plane settle up, determine whether you are pushing/pulling on the yoke and then trim those forces off. Of course if the forces are excessive trim most of it away, wait for the plane to settle and then finish trimming. The test is being able to let go of the plane at any time and the plane is still doing what it was doing before you let it go. Students never seem to see the importance of trimmed, hands-off flight until they have to either triangulate their position during a lost procedure or divert to an airport other than the one flight planned. Trying to fold and unfold those damn sectionals without being able to take your hands off the yoke can be a handful. On my private checkride the DE expected me to let go of the yoke, check for traffic, draw and compute to my diversion, check for traffic, maintain a shallow turn as I held altitude and check for traffic.
Stephen Ames

Comment

 
 External Links
 Recent articles
Keys For Successful Learning
P B 1 Time of year B BR Summer flying gives longer days but does not provide the most desirable range of experience...

Instruction
Initially the ground instruction begins with basic background and theory The flight lesson is predicated by the use of preflight and Postflight briefings...

Medical Certification
P You do not need a medical certificate until you fly by yourself It is suggested that you get your medical before you go to any major...

PTS Oral/Flight Test
Meet with examiner before the tests and ask relevant questions BR Examiners weight BR Cross country plan BR Weather contingencies BR Cost...

Shirt Tails
There has been a long tradition in aviation related to cutting off the shirt tails of newly soloed student pilots One story has it that the practice ...

Eights
P Eights combine the skills acquired from doing left and right turns about a point and S turns First find a with one leg giving ...

Landing Illusions
P You and every other pilot is susceptible to illusions When any of our three flight senses visual auditory and kinesthetic give erroneous information...

Why and When of Accidents
1 One fourth of forced landings are related to maintenance or mechanical failure BR 2 1 3 accidents in landing ...

Communication, ATC & Radar
Acknowledgment and compliance BR Uses appropriate ATC procedures BR Emergency and NORDO procedure BR Practice and performance BR Maintains U ...

The First Solo
P There are many self induced stresses on the student prior to solo The student begins to worry about it never happening the cost how...

The Cockpit
P Using the tape recorder I go over all the instruments and controls I pay particular attention to the markings and divisions on the dials their...

Introduction to The Radio
P I introduce the ATIS frequency 124 7 the alphabetical sequencing order of information during the day and how to use this information ...

Additional Endorsements
High performance aircraft over 200 hp BR Complex aircraft Gear and flaps BR Tail wheel ...

Flight Contradictions
ul li The rudder is not used to turn the plane Rather it keeps the nose straight BR...

Instructional Constants
A number of constants have been recommended Constants while not the only way to fly simplify the complexities of maneuvering an...

How We Got Pattern A and Pattern B
These patterns have been for many years a part of the Instrument Flying Handbook as among the first lessons in acquiring the aircraft control required for instrument flying ...

Statistics on General Aviation Accidents
ol li 51 of pilots were between 40 49 BR li 71 were private pilots BR ...

The Competence of Incompetence
With the advent of a new study as to what constitutes competence there is a new fear by the self assured that they may be among ...

Prohibited Areas
Don #146;t fly here ever White House Personal residence of President Area within 5 miles of president is prohibited airspace at any time Some prohibited...

Help Your Instructor
P The more an instructor knows about you your background motivation finances and goals the better he will be able to advise you on ...

Area Familiarization
P I have instructed at a largely general aviation airport CCR with two sets of dual runways This has been fortunate because the potential complexity...

1998 Statistics
li B Over 20 of all G A fatal accidents had weather as contributing factor BR ...

Post-Landing
P Once on the ground Do not relax Hold the yoke back and properly positioned for taxi For any turns off the runway the yoke should...

MEL Decision Sequence
P The pilot recognizes inoperative instruments or equipment P P B Question: B P P...

Pre-takeoff
Uses checklist BR Takeoff configuration BR Radio use and acknowledgments and compliance BR Clearing approach ...

Viva la Difference
Where male and female students are similar: BR Individual differences of greater importance BR Learning differences more related...

Scanning (instructor notes)
P I suggest a scan process of having the student follow my finger as I point successively from HI to AI VSI to AI Altimeter to ...

Good Instruction
Communication BR Knowledge and ability to explain BR Ability to demonstrate BR Patience BR Motivation...

Basic Maneuver Tolerances
Altitude U U 200 feet BR Heading U U 10 degrees BR Speed U ...

Shoulder Harness
1 As of 1975 4 out of every 5 people ever killed in airplanes since the Wright brothers would have been alive if they had been ...

Why Pilots Walk Funny
Ever wonder why propeller pilots walk funny They do The P factor explanation from the instructors handbook tells the instructor how to explain this to the...

The Unteachable Student
I have found that my methods and I am incompatible with about 5 of my students This was true when I was teaching...

Ear Block
P Caused when the Eustachian tube becomes blocked Earblock or sinus blockages can cause differential air pressures to exist between cavities of the skull and the exterior...

1999 Was A Very Good Year
1908 general aviation accidents BR 342 were fatal accidents BR 7 05 accidents per 100 000 hours of flying BR ...

Judgement of Limitations
B The ability of a student to plan a safe flight or flying activity is determined by his judgment of his limitations It ...

Inspections
P FAR 43 11 a b Type description date total time signature certificate type and number; approval or disapproval for return ...

Light Series
P The light gun is used by ATC towers in the event of radio failure to move and sequence aircraft In general all GREEN signals ...

What You Know, Gets In The Way of What You Don't Know
The learning law of #39;Primacy #39; is what makes developing proper habits first build the foundation for what you will do when under stress...

Pilotage and Dead Reckoning
Course within 3 nautical miles BR Altitude U U 200 BR Arrival within 5 minutes BR Heading within 15 degrees...

Postflight Debriefing
The postflight debriefing begins as a self evaluation by both student and instructor as to why certain operations were less than successful or why...

FAR 61.43 Flight Tests
a Perform pilot operations BR 1 Executing maneuvers within performance capability and limitations including use of the aircraft #39;s systems BR ...

Utilizing Hood Training
P The FAA integrated mix of VFR and IFR instruction is a violation of the very instructional precepts considered basic to flight instruction The purpose of the...

Reaction and Anticipation
P In searching for an appropriate place for this material I was surprised at how often the terms appeared the variety of context and application to...

Commitment to Flying
ol li You must be able to give priority to the time and energy required for learning to fly If you can #39;t...

Emergency Equipment
ELT operation and ground activation BR Fuses breakers ...

Flying With Your Senses
One of the reasons I teach flying with a very limited selection of power settings airspeed configurations and attitudes is because I...

Absolute Altitude
Absolute altitude is obtained by the use of radar The first radar altimeter was the A N 718 I worked with it during WWII ...

Fixed Gear Accidents
ul li 1 in 7 accidents result in a fatality in fixed gear aircraft BR li 8 of 10 fixed gear accidents...

Your CFI As A Hazard
li 75 of flight training accidents related to improper gear operation occurs with CFI aboard BR li 50...

Takeoffs
Alignment BR Rotation and liftoff BR Drift correction BR Airborne alignment check BR Clearing turns ...

 Related Links
 
©2010 4VFR.COM, All Rights Reserved Powered by 4vfr.com